Ceramics Monthly

Ceramics Monthly

Bomb It by Kay Whitney

Jeff Schwarz’s sculptural vessels are the result of a delicate conceptual balancing act. Lying midway between popular culture and fine art, between functional and sculptural ceramics, his work bears all the trademarks of cultural resistance while existing comfortably within ceramic traditions. His elongated cylindrical forms eliminate distinctions between pop and conceptualism, painting and sculpture. His expertly crafted work is confrontational and contemplative, freeform and intuitive. It gives the appearance of wild spontaneity while being grounded in a painstaking series of decisions that owe much to ceramic craft and his background in painting. His decorative appropriation of graffiti-like mark making is in itself contradictory as it results from a highly controlled, deliberate process in total opposition to everything graffiti generally represents.

 

While graffiti is the term used to describe spray-can tagging with its everything-on-the-street implications, Schwarz’s work could be more accurately described as post-graffiti as this more closely corresponds to his painstaking techniques. Since its first appearance in the 1970s, when taggers went around bombing subway cars with spray paint, graffiti has changed considerably. No longer a renegade form of expression, Graffiti is now an established art movement; in artists’ studios the spray can is as ubiquitous as the brush. 

 
Art in America

Art in America

Exhibitions on the Lookout: Respectability Politics by Celine Katzman

09/23/2016

The group show “Respectability Politics” asks how identity shapes participation in the art world and determines the parameters of acceptable behavior. Happy Ending (Onegai, Onegai, Onegai, Let Me Get What I Want), a 2016 installation by Kat JK Lee at the center of the gallery, features a body pillow displaying a drawing of an androgynous anime-style character wearing a schoolgirl’s uniform over hairy legs. The gagged face is split open to reveal a grimacing skull, and the body threateningly wields a baseball bat, even though it’s bound in chains. The pillow sits in a hot-pink kiddie pool, submerged in lube, its masochistic image distorted by the viscous fluid. Other pieces in the show include Sophia Wallace’s neon sign that spells lit clit in pink cursive, and Julian Lorber’s This is How We Play Now (2016), an installation of metal-studded baseballs embedded in the gallery walls as if they were chucked at them. The transgressive energy in these works serves as a reminder of norms of decency in the art world and beyond, prompting a reflection on who gains from flouting them, and how.

The Creator's Project

The Creator's Project

Enter a Living Embodiment of a Poetry Magazine by Lorelei Ramirez

8/18/2016

The contents of a "conceptual live magazine," in which the pieces in a space are arranged to be read and interacted with, emerges at Outlet Gallery in Brooklyn. Curated by Charles Shields and Julian A. Jimarez Howard, Postprint Magazine’s first issue, Expensive Poetry, is a nonexistent print publication featuring works by eight artists, including Sharon Butler, Paul D’Agostino, and Giovanna Olmos.

Instead, Jimarez Howard and Shields take the idea of art on a printed page and expand it beyond its reach, imagining future issues in different locations. “When you enter the exhibition space, you’re quite literally standing inside the first issue of Postprint Magazine. In the future, this issue will exist as an archive on the website of Outlet Gallery andPostprint Magazine, but it’s conditioned to be most deeply experienced IRL,” says Shields. The pieces invite you to engage and explore and become a part of the installation, much like flipping through the pages of a brand new mag...

Hyperallergic

Hyperallergic

Art Rx by Jillian Steinhauer with contributions by Elisa Wouk Almino

08/02/2016

Meet Postprint Magazine, a new project dedicated to sharing poetry IRL. Its first issue, Expensive Poetry, comes in the form an exhibition at Outlet and seeks to break free from the bonds of the page. By interpreting the colorful, pricey aesthetic of periodicals and presenting poetry that the viewer (or reader?) must physically move through, the exhibition promises to be as much a literary as a visual experience. —EWA

 
Bedford + Bowery

Bedford + Bowery

Art Openings: Pins N’ Patches, Cheap Art, Magazines IRL by Cassidy Dawn Graves

08/01/2016

Their upcoming show doubles as an unveiling of Postprint Magazine, a “space for poetry that lives beyond the printed page, IRL.” Eight artists will be showing work that explores the limitations inherent in poetry and, beyond that, words themselves.

Hyperallergic

Hyperallergic

Art Rx by Jillian Steinhauer

03/15/2016

This week is all about openings: of an unexpected David Hammons retrospective, an exhibition of socially engaged artists, a show of male nudes by female artists, and, after much anticipation, the Met Breuer.

Everyone knows that women basically have to be naked to get into the Met Museum. The canon of art history rests on the nude, namely the female one. So it’s always refreshing to see a show, no matter how small, attempt to flip the gaze. At Outlet, Julian A. Jimarez Howard has curated the great-sounding (and looking) NSFW, which features paintings of male nudes by six female artists, plus a “choreographed artwork” by a seventh. Incidentally, Garis & Hahn’s Beyond the Gaze: Women Painting Women should make for a nice pairing.

CoolHunting

CoolHunting

NSFW at OUTLET, Brooklyn | Turning the tables, the new exhibition will show male nudes painted by women artists

3/14/2016

Portraits of naked women litter gallery and art fair walls; but spotting the contemporary male nude, in contrast, seems to be as rare as sighting the yeti. The male gaze is still alive and kicking—evident across every visual medium, from film to advertisements, where women subjects are little more than objects shaped by desires and idealization not their own. We've seen conversation-starting work come from women artists who turn the camera on themselves (Arvida BystromAnnie Leibovitz, and Pixy Yijun Liao, to name a few), but taking it further is a new exhibition at Bushwick gallery OUTLET Fine Art. Cheekily titled "NSFW," it will feature male nude works by women painters, and more importantly, a variety of depictions that go beyond celebrating the naked man's virility, masculinity and power (a too-common result of "male objectification").

PROFESSIONAL WOMEN PHOTOGRAPHERS

PROFESSIONAL WOMEN PHOTOGRAPHERS

Mean Streets: 4 Photographers, 4 Decades by Catherine Kirkpatrick

10/27/2015

Before shimmering condos rose on every corner, before Donald Trump sought higher office and everyone had a camera on their phone, a group of gifted photographers–real photographers–prowled the urban jungle. Four of them–Amy Arbus, Alan Kleinberg, Ash Thayer and Andre D. Wagner–are featured in an exhibition at the OUTLET Gallery called Hit the Street.

Close Quarters

Close Quarters

John Silvis at Green Hill Gallery, Berlin

John Silvis extends his latest work to Berlin, Germany in his second solo show titled 'Close Quarters'. 

 

Hyperallergic

Hyperallergic

Libby Hartle / Kristen Jensen leads New York Art Guide for fall 2015

In Hyperallergic’s first ever New York Art Guide for fall 2015, Outlet's upcoming exhibition featuring new work by Libby Hartle and Kristen Jensen lead the list of must-see, fun, insightful, and very New York art exhibitions and events this season.

Artnet News

Must-See Art Events in New York This Week

Organized and curated by Noah Becker, Jeffrey Grunthaner, and Julian A. Jimarez and sponsored by Whitehot Magazine, this aptly-named group show is "inspired by signage, the way bodies appear against different architectural backdrops, and the significance ascribed to places." The exhibition will also feature readings and performances throughout its two-week run.

Art Market Monitor

Art Market Monitor

ArtList’s 3 Must See Shows: Art shows you can’t miss this week in New York

Outlet’s new exhibition challenges the delineation between art and the space in which it takes place. As the title alludes, the show questions the delineations between what we absorb from art, where we witness art and how we reference that experience in the future. It features work from such artists as Mira Alibek, Heidi Howard, Andrea McGinty, Eric Shaw and Weronika Twardowska. The exhibit further engages its own environment with performances from Sonya Derman and Luiza Kurzyna as well as readings from Anselm Berrigan, Sophia Le Fraga, Nicole Reber, Andrea McGinty and more.

Art F City

Art F City

Is Site Specificity Relevant to a Generation of Nomads? Not Really. By Michael Anthony Farley

I can’t think of a group show I’ve seen this year as disorienting as Sight | Site | Cite. At the boisterous opening last weekend, several people loudly debated what was and wasn’t part of the exhibition. As is a common sight at many events in artist-run venues, there were phones plugged into outlets around the gallery. At least one of these, however, was a piece by Andrea McGinty which flashed the text “he told me not to mention his strap on” below a portrait of video artist Sondra Perry by painter Heidi Howard. Another iPhone—this one with a cracked screen—was playing garbled music from the back of a remote-controlled toy Hummer SUV. This was careening around the crowded floor, accompanied by (a performer?) who was alternately shoving gallery-goers from behind and aggressively gyrating in front of artworks. It was a lot to take in.

Whitehot Magazine

Whitehot Magazine

Sight | Site | Cite: A discussion with the Curators

Showing at OUTLET Fine Art in Bushwick, Brooklyn from August 22nd through September 6th, Sight | Site | Cite aspires to provide discontinuous but related occasions for creative assemblies that extend the environing, design-like character of the works on exhibit. The upshot of a conversation between myself, Jeff Grunthaner, and the painter and publisher of Whitehot Magazine Noah Becker, the curator and artist Julian Jimarez-Howard was intrigued by our proposal and agreed to co-curate and host the exhibition at his gallery, which he co-runs with curators Jason Andrew and John Silvis.

The exhibition is part of an ongoing series of shows sponsored by Whitehot Magazine. The following is a transcription of a conversation we recently had about some of the artists involved and our curatorial process.

The summer continues to sizzle at Outlet as all three partners accept invites to curate beyond the Wilson Avenue Space

The summer continues to sizzle for the partners at Outlet Fine Art. Jason Andrew, Julian Jimarez-Howard and John Silvis have all accepted invitiations to curate beyond their noted Wilson Avenue space.

VICE

VICE

Siki Im's New York State of Mind by Wilbert L. Cooper

Menswear designer Siki Im was fascinated by the culture of New York City long before he set foot in the five boroughs. The fashion designer grew up in Germany listening to legendary New York artists like the Wu-Tang Clan, John Coltrane, and Quicksand. But he still found inspiration in its fertile streetwear culture, then led by brands like Alife and the slim, rocker-inspired looks of Cloak. His interest in fashion was also spurned by the diverse people he met in the city's outer boroughs, who wore styles that mixed their immigrant roots with American culture—taxi drivers who paired Middle Eastern tunics with bomber jackets.

Business Insider-Andre D. Wagner

Business Insider-Andre D. Wagner

20 raw images from the streets of New York by Jack Sommer

Wagner shoots on film using a Leica camera, but his process is quick. He is able to react quickly, sometimes in less than a second, to moments he wants to capture. His philosophy is to shoot first, and deal with everything else later.

 
HYPERALLERGIC: Robin Kang

HYPERALLERGIC: Robin Kang

In Bushwick, an Exhibition Tears Down Walls Between Art and Craft by Benjamin Sutton

Neo-Craftivism, a group show at the Parlour Bushwick, brings together works by nine artists that dynamite the tired old boundaries separating craft and art. As a precedent, co-curators Rachael Gorchov, Roxanne Jackson, and Robin Kang cite Betsy Greer, the artist who in 2003 coined the term “craftivism” — which she defined as “the practice of engaged creativity, especially regarding political or social causes” — but their show has a more specific mission.

Please see the review here!

Robin Kang on Konbini

Robin Kang on Konbini

This Artist Uses a Digital Loom to Weave Chips and Processors by Pierre Bienaimé

Robin Kang’s thinks her Bushwick studio might house the only digital loom in New York City. Or at least, the only model of the Norwegian-designed Thread Controller 2.

The TC2, as it’s also called, allows artists to scan and communicate designs to the digital loom through a computer before weaving them by hand, line by line.

Kang takes computer parts like processors and chips for subjects; the result is a big rectangular homage to machine technology.

 

 

Two Coats of Paint

Two Coats of Paint

Blast of Color: Mink and Dolnick at Outlet by Sharon Butler

"An avalanche of color has no force," Matisse wrote in 1945. "Color attains its full expression only when it is organized, when it corresponds to the emotional intensity of the artist." At OUTLET this month, Jason Andrew presents the impressive work of Lucy Mink and Judith Dolnick, painters who seem to live for color, and since I have been exploring color in some of my new projects and paintings, I decided to ask them about their relationship to what is probably the most elusive and complex element in painting.

Arts In Bushwick Blog

Arts In Bushwick Blog

Time and the Artist: A Portrait of Judith Dolnick by Catherine Kirkpatrick

A profile on the painter Judith Dolnick offering insight to her early beginnings (which parallel much of the early Bushwick scene): "Inside the gallery, a sense of peace descends, the urban jungle fades into a mythic grove; color and form, shadow and light, abstract as notes of music, play on in timeless space. The opening on May 15 drew the usual art-scene crowd, but at the center of it all was a unique and elegant woman in pearls, the artist Judith Dolnick. Though showing her work in Bushwick, Dolnick is not your average hipster."

"Judith Dolnick: Little Master"

"Judith Dolnick: Little Master"

the discovery of an unpublished essay by Lawrence Campbell

One of the great art critics of our time, Lawrence Campbell (1914-1998), grabbling with the "state of the arts" wrote this essay on the occasion of Judith Dolnick's exhibition at Gimpel & Weitzenhoffer in the fall of 1983. Left unpublished and recently uncovered by curator, Jason Andrew, the text speaks to the difficulties of evaluating art that escapes immediate description. Art that is "damned hard to write about because it does not have the shock value of the perplexing." He discusses the "decorative" and his annoyance of the term. He then introduces the work of Judith Dolnick writing, "I vaguely sense that Dolnick, like every artist, has a few chosen ancestors. Bonnard, Klee, perhaps Klimt among twentieth century artists. But above all, I find affinities with the greatest name of the eighteenth century, with Tiepolo." He ends his essay with, "All great epochs of art in the past have been marked by their ability to sustain 'Little Masters.' In America today, we have super-stars. But when we have to decide between a false super-star and a real 'Little Master,' we resolutely plunk for the sham superstar. It is time we looked about us with less haste."

Brooklyn Based

Brooklyn Based

5 Must-See Studios and Exhibits at Bushwick Open Studios 2015

June 5, 2015

Writer Tiffany Charbonier makes the current show at Outlet Fine Art one of five top must-sees during the 2015 Bushwick Open Studios.

Interview: Judith Dolnick

Interview: Judith Dolnick

by Leda Natkin Nelis

May 22, 2015

On the occasion of the artist’s first solo show in New York in 28 years at Outlet Fine Art, Judith Dolnick spoke with her daughter, the historian Leda Natkin Nelis, to discuss what continues to drive the 80 year old artist whose career has spanned over five decades.

Select Art Fair

Select Art Fair

Robin Kang featured at Select Art Fair May 13-17

We are pleased to announce Robin Kang showing recent work at Select Art Fair with New Apostle Gallery, Brooklyn

 

 

Pastiche Mag

John Silvis interviewed by Pastiche Mag at MAD6 in Madrid

 

The Culture Trip

The Culture Trip

The Top 10 Galleries in Bushwick, NYC

Sharing borders with Queens and Williamsburg, Bushwick has emerged onto the NYC art scene as local artists draw inspiration from the neighborhood’s gritty, industrial landscape as well as its community atmosphere. Bushwick’s galleries are nurturing exhibition spaces that feature the work of both established and emerging artists - take a look at our list of ten of the best.

HYPERALLERGIC

HYPERALLERGIC

Excavating Environmental Politics from Pristine Paintings and Photos by Benjamin Sutton

Art with an environmentalist message can take very literal forms, from a chunk of Arctic ice kept frozen by solar power to a field of wheat planted in a bustling metropolis, but it can also come in the guise of elegant abstract paintings and digitally manipulated photographs. Those are the primary means employed by Julian Lorber and Mark Dorf, respectively, in their two-person show Second Nature at Outlet Fine Art.

Painting is Dead

Painting is Dead

Alejandro Jassan with John Silvis

The contemporary art world has become much more complex in the past few years, forcing its players to redesign the role they each will take; artists become dealers, curators become collectors, and even mainstream pop stars become critics. Nonetheless, there has been a beacon of hope in artist-run spaces, where programming goes beyond the sales point and offers an outlet (no pun intended) of creativity for emerging practitioners.

The Art Blog

The Art Blog

Exchange Rates — The Bushwick Expo by Elizabeth Johnson

11/12/2014

I finished my tour at Active Space, where Bushwick’s Associated Gallery, OUTLET, and Parallel Art Space are hosting Artist Proof Studio (printmakers from South Africa), and Telescope (Beijing) and FORT (London) galleries in Altered Terrain: this sprawling but well-organized show considers modern landscape as it ranges from the abstract to the realistic. Matthew Shelly’s folded paper sculptures, Heeseop Yoon’s giant, site-specific Mylar wall drawing, and Joshua Johnson’s erudite installations make high marks in forward thinking, setting me up to relish the lush, Albrect Durer-like linocuts by Johannesburg’s Jan Tshikhutula. I scan these potent renderings for historic or political references, seeking qualities that separate them from European tradition or define them as exclusively South African; yet I come up empty, and conscious that my expectation adds not a whit to Jan’s extraordinary vistas.

Art F City

Art F City

Benign Diplomacy: The Bushwick International Reviewed

10/28/2014

Active Space also warranted a visit this weekend, even if Heeseop Yoon’s egregious, sprawling tape mural threatened to dominate the experience. Beijing artist Bai Ye installed four digital prints, each depicting a bust-like figure as if drawn free-hand in charcoal. Ye installed the prints on top of a digitally-rendered textual wallpaper; the elaborated modeling of his abstracted busts, which in their awkward depth but detailed surfaces, dynamically contrasted with the smooth rhythms of the background layer. Joshua Johnson’s readymades got the most mileage of the “mixed media” genre, combining rocks, angular forms, and dated technology in bizarrely tragicomic, yet understated combines. I have to divulge my affection for Jan Tshikhutula’s immersive linocuts, which perhaps showed off a reactionary streak in their sentimental landscapes, but also showed off the optic richness of a medium underrepresented in contemporary practice. To hazard a descriptive cliché, Tshikhutula’s works played on a tension between the articulation of detail and the composition of the whole.

HYPERALLERGIC

HYPERALLERGIC

Making Cents of Exchange Rates Bushwick

10/27/2014

One of the international affair’s strongest shows was the one featuring the greatest number of local galleries. Bushwick’s Parallel Art Space, Associated Gallery, and Outlet brought their A-game to a vast and very rewarding group show in The Active Space‘s first floor gallery, which they shared with Johannesburg’s Artist Proof Studio, Beijing’s Telescope Gallery, and London’s Fort Gallery. Heeseop Yoon’s formidable tape mural at the rear of the space, “Still Life” (2014), presented by Outlet, proved a potent pairing with Jan Tshikhutula’s evocative, black-and-white linocut prints.

HYPERALLERGIC

HYPERALLERGIC

A Race to the Finish Through Bushwick with Beat Nite

10/27/2014

For Exchange Rates, Associated GalleryOutlet Fine ArtParallel Art SpaceFort GalleryArtist Proof Studio, and Telescope all converged on the Active Space, where work by 12 artists was thrown together under the theme/title Altered Terrain. Even though the idea of shifting environments is vague enough that it can be applied to almost anything, it did seem to work as a thread here, pulling together pieces in a variety of media that seemed concerned with both analogue and digital archaeologies. Bai Ye’s stunning installation of three digital prints on wallpaper “Infinitely Close” (2014) stole the show, but contributions from Bevan De Wet, Rob Leech, and Julian Lorber more than held their own.

Bushwick Daily

Bushwick Daily

At Outlet, Artist Cristin Richard’s Work Goes way Beyond Skin-Deep

10/22/14

When I walked into OUTLET Fine Art the other night for the opening of Beneath the Skin, an exhibition featuring the pseudo-sculptural objets d’art of Cristin Richard, the incredible beauty and the delicacy of the works immediately struck me. Suspended from the ceiling were translucent garment bags with crimson colored dresses peaking through. A soundtrack of trans-inducing music of Nate Czarling subtly blaring from the other room as I walked amongst the boutique-like surrounding, catching glimpses of my reflection in the high-finish works by Joseph Moore. I was enjoying the seemingly store-like aesthetic of the work around me when, press release in hand, I came to understand fully what I was really looking at.

The L Magazine

The L Magazine

4 Art Exhibits You Need to See

10/21/2014

Cristin Richard's exquisitely designed, cutely petite dresses made of animal intestines, reined in by gut-resin-hybrid garment bags and slung up on industrial hooks are much more than lightly macabre, painstakingly crafted apotheoses of whole-hog-type pragmatism or meta-culinary chitlins. They are also a very effectively disturbed, albeit not quite disturbing inquiry into body identity, femininity, pre-packaged notions of self, and material otherness and malleability. Conceptual innards aside, Richard's pieces are also, in a rather disarming way, somehow endearing, somehow charming, which is even more so the case with the artist's far more formally plectic gown hovering high in the gallery's back room. Mirrors etched with jarred orthographies by Joseph Moore, a visually strident video piece by Matthew Caron, and a stormy loop of music composed by Nate Czarling surround and interact with Richard's looming garments—and they round out quite well a consummately visceral, subtly bizarre exhibit that's unlikely to cycle out of the guts of your mind with any swiftness.

City & State

City & State

Cultural Erosion: A Snapshot of Fine Art In Brooklyn

Critic and curator Sarah Schmerler offers her insight to the state of the arts from the perspective of an indepentent curator gallery sitting at Outlet Fine Art: "It’s Sunday afternoon, and Mo Kong, a 24-year-old Chinese MFA student at the Rhode Island School of Design, and I are sitting inside OUTLET Fine Art looking out the windows at passersby. Located on a remote stretch of Wilson Avenue, the gallery is one of the best in Bushwick."

Two Coats of Paint

Two Coats of Paint

Who is Agnes Magruder? by Sharon Butler

June 8, 2014

Sharon Butler offers an insightful look at the woman Arshile Gorky dedicated many of his exquisite drawings to, including the very fine example featured in the current show at Outlet Fine Art through June 29.

New Criterion

New Criterion

Gallery Chronicle

June 7, 2014

In a survey of the Bushwick art scene, critic James Panero writes, "A week after BOS, Outlet will open an ambitious summer show that will link a 1946 drawing by Arshile Gorky with work by thirty modern and contemporary artists, including Gregory Amenoff, William Anastasi, Judy Dolnick, Hermine Ford, Margrit Lewcuk, Michael Prodanou, and Joan Snyder."

Bushwick Daily

Bushwick Daily

Best Art in Bushwick

June 5, 2014

Despite Bushwick being a mecca of many amazing artists, we don’t see an artist of Arshile Gorky’s stature in town very often.

ArtNet News

ArtNet News

New York Gallery Beat: 6 Critics Review 16 Shows by Jeffrey Grunthaner

May 21, 2014

Encountering the photographs of Alex Singh in the back gallery after passing through OUTLET’s front-room display of images by veteran filmmaker and photo journalist Alan Kleinberg, the connection between these two artists will almost feel predestined, despite the differences of generation.

The Vernissage

The Vernissage

OUT ALL NIGHT by The Vernissage

May 13, 2014

We bet most of you have heard at least once of how cool New York was in the Eighties. Most of us have an unexplainable nostalgia for a time we never experienced, except through movies and music. Of course we know about Warhol and his Factory, the crazy nights at the Studio 54 and the never sleeping streets of the Greenwich Village. We wish we could have seen that!

L'Oeil de la Photographie

L'Oeil de la Photographie

Brooklyn: Out All Night with Alan Kleinberg by Elizabeth Avedon

May 8, 2014

Alan Kleinberg’s must-see debut exhibition opens with 29 black and white images from his vast archive of New York City’s downtown scene during the 1970’s. Focusing on Andy Warhol’s Factory, the Mudd Club, and the Greenwich Village restaurant One Fifth, “Kleinberg captures the energy of the period and his friendships with the artists, writers, dancers, models and musicians who made a lasting impact on the contemporary art scene in New York at that time.”

EYEBEAM

EYEBEAM

The New Romantics curated by Claudia Hart, Nicholas O’Brien and Katie Torn

April 17, 2014

Katie Torn co-curates an exhibition at Eyebeam!

Miao Jiaxin performs his newest work on Friday, April 25 at 6:30 pm

New York Times

New York Times

Chasing a Dream and an Unalloyed Ethos A Critic’s Picks in Brooklyn, an Embattled Utopia by Martha Schwendener and Pete Wells

April 3, 2014

ARRIVE in Brooklyn, and you’ve entered the belly of contemporary art. It’s our 19th-century Paris or 18th-century Rome, with one of the largest concentrations of artists in the world. Here, you’ll find both commercial galleries and nonprofit and artist-run spaces — and thousands upon thousands of places you can visit during open-studio weekends scattered throughout the year.

ArtNet News

ArtNet News

Is There Still Life in the Still Life Genre? Yes, and OUTLET’s New Show Proves It by Jeffrey Grunthaner

March 28, 2014

If you look at the works by the five artists included in the well-curated show, “Still.Life” (which closes March 30), a unifying idea starts to emerge. Each artist is pursuing an authentic strategy for engaging with the visual language of still life across media. Whatever the show might lack in intensity—being somewhat sparse—it makes up for by asking the question: What can still lifes look like only today? The answers it proposes are very compelling.

Brooklyn Magazine

Brooklyn Magazine

The 100 Most Influential People in Brooklyn Culture

March 11, 2014

Congrats to OUTLET partner Jason Andrew for being recognized as one of the 100 influential culture makers in Brooklyn!

Jason Andrew
Curator/Cofounder, Norte Maar
After founding the intrepid arts organization Norte Maar in 2004, Jason Andrew continues to curate independently at Outlet Gallery in Bushwick. On February 28, he hosted the 10th-ever Beat Nite, which allowed 10 selected art spaces to say open late, followed by an after-party at The Narrows.

Bushwick Armory Arts Weekend

Bushwick Armory Arts Weekend

Bushwick Galleries open from 6-10 pm

March 8, 2014

Coinciding with the Armory Arts Weekend, Bushwick Galleries welcome guests to the neighborhood by providing a complimentary bus!

Bushwick Daily

Bushwick Daily

Fiber is the New Black: AZETTAGH brings textiles to OUTLET Fine Art by Julia Sinelnikova

February 13, 2014

Fiber arts have risen to prominence in recent years, especially with artists who consider textiles in their work such as Ghada Amer and El Anatsui. In a neighborhood as multidisciplinary as Bushwick, it is nothing new to see artists turning “traditional” materials on their head as a conduit for something completely new. Despite increased appreciation for fiber-based work, Azettagh, a new exhibition at OUTLET Fine Arts which pairs four contemporary women artists with a selection of contemporary Moroccan rugs, brings an arrestingly fresh perspective to works which redefine “craft” as design.

Two Coats of Paint

Two Coats of Paint

Idiosyncratic rule in Brooklyn by Sharon Butler

January 11, 2014

Two recommendations for Brooklyn gallery visits:

At Outlet Fine Art, seasoned painter Hermine Ford continues her exploration of urban decay and renewal in quirky shaped canvases that depict fragments of floor tile mosaics. In the new work Ford begins to loosen up, combining a more gestural painting approach and larger scale shifts with the tighter, more illustrative technique from previous outings...

Two Coats of Paint

Two Coats of Paint

On Film and Painting: Repetitive Stress by Sharon Butler

January 5, 2014

The difference, of course, is that an art show imparts to the viewer the experience of the artist herself rather than that of some third-party biographical subject; no intermediary in the form of director or writer is required. What a painter and a director (or screenwriter) share, I think, is the aim of inducing the viewer to feel the strain of enforced rumination – the moviegoer by sitting attentively and inquisitively through the film, the gallery-crawler by trying to discern the paintings’ minutely distinguishing features.

Hyperallergic

Hyperallergic

The Point of No Return by Robert Cicetti

January 3, 2014

The artist’s 21st century take on an ancient tea ceremony reduces the daily routine of contemporary life to its rawest elements. Wearing a suit, tie, and sunglasses, Miao plays the archetypal corporate goon, drinking tea, and smoking a cigarette, all while reading Chinese business papers and the Wall Street Journal. As the embodiment of conspicuous consumption, he vainly attempts to purge himself of its toxic impact on the spirit.

Huffington Post

Huffington Post

4 Contemporary Female Artists Who Are Shaping The Future Of Painting by Priscilla Frank

December 29, 2013

Belanger's work gives the impression that some sort of cosmic event has just occurred, or, perhaps, is about to occur. Time is disjointed in her works, which seem simultaneously like "before" and "after" images of an earth-shattering occurrence. The viewer is left to put together the clues, becoming entranced with the visual intricacies of everyday objects in the process.

THE L MAGAZINE

THE L MAGAZINE

The 10 Biggest Developments in Brooklyn Art of 2013 by Paul D'Agostino

December 18, 2013

As many likely predicted a year ago, Brooklyn’s various art neighborhoods and their respective spaces and institutions were more active than ever in 2013.

Bushwick Daily

Bushwick Daily

The Boys Are Back in Town! Best Bushwick Art after Miami Basel This Weekend by Allison Galgiani

December 12, 2013

While stories from the comedic to scandalous are whizzing around the art world a week after the Miami Art Basel Spring Break of the art world (and artists and gallerists alike continue to nurse epic hangovers), one would think that this would send the New York art world into a full-on art coma. Fear not, my fair citizens of Bushwick, for as the ragers who experienced Bushwick Gone Basel know, the Bushwick art world’s tough skin remains unfazed and ready to enter into a fantastic week of art events galore! Trying to stay in front of the onslaught of holiday madness, galleries and pop-ups all over, the neighborhood will be hosting openings featuring a slew of new artists and fun! Here are some of the Bushwick galleries that have something exciting to offer – see if you can catch ‘em all!

ARTslant at AQUA MIAMI

ARTslant at AQUA MIAMI

Robin Kang is awarded 2013 ARTslant Purchase Prize

December 8, 2013

Robin Kang's striking textile work, Core Memory, was awarded the 2013 purchase prize and is now a part of the ArtSlant Collection

THE L MAGAZINE

THE L MAGAZINE

OUTLET: New Inputs & Insights by Paul D'Agostino

December 4, 2013

OUTLET: New Inputs & Insights--Situated in a storefront space in more or less the true geographic heart of Bushwick, OUTLET Fine Art is not exactly new. Recently, however, it has undergone a fair amount of internal renewal—physical, administrative and, in a way, alliterative—to give it a renewed face and a couple of new faces. Founder Julian A. Jimarez Howard is now joined by Norte Maar Director Jason Andrew and artist John Silvis to form a curatorial triumvirate. We asked each how he became involved with and envisions this joint endeavor.

DNAinfo

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Curators Join to Launch Bushwick Artists Into World Museums and Collections by Meredith Hoffman

November 4, 2013

New Curator Team Joins OUTLET Fine Art in Bushwick, Brooklyn